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    Techdirt Interview of Ira Rothken
    -Discussion of Ira Rothken's career handling internet copyright cases

    February 23, 2012 Radio New Zealand
    -US abuse of power in taking down Megaupload
    -No such thing as criminal secondary copyright infringement
    -The Prosecution is politically motivated 

    Ira Rothken presentation at e-discovery seminar (excerpt)
    - discussion of technical-legal factors to consider in determining whether e-discovery related data is "not reasonably accessible"
    - More information can be found here 
     

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      « Professor Lessig from Harvard Law School Provides Expert Opinion in the Kim Dotcom Extradition Case | Main | Megaupload Opposes Server Data Destruction »
      Monday
      Sep142015

      Megaupload Files Reply Brief in Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals Asking for Reversal of Fugitive Disentitlement

      Megaupload, Kim Dotcom, and others filed their reply brief today in the Fourth Circuit Court of Appeals urging the Court to reverse the trial court's finding of "Fugitive Disentitlement."

      Here is an excerpt from the reply brief:

      "The government asks this Court to affirm a forfeiture order that is purely advisory, was justified only by Claimants’ exercise of their right to oppose extradition, and was obtained without any opportunity to contest the government’s case on the merits. Our justice system requires more. Claimants have not been convicted of any crime, have not fled the jurisdiction, and have not been extradited. They stand ready to defend their property—located entirely in countries that have refused to enforce the U.S. forfeiture orders. But without considering the merits, the district court declared that property forfeited. That order contravenes fundamental jurisdictional requirements, statutory commands, and due process..."

      Read the full reply brief.

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