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    -Discussion of Ira Rothken's career handling internet copyright cases

    February 23, 2012 Radio New Zealand
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    -The Prosecution is politically motivated 

    Ira Rothken presentation at e-discovery seminar (excerpt)
    - discussion of technical-legal factors to consider in determining whether e-discovery related data is "not reasonably accessible"
    - More information can be found here 
     

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      Main | Kim Dotcom Announces Settlement of a Lawsuit Against the New Zealand Police for Unreasonable Conduct Arising out of a Military Style Raid »
      Wednesday
      Mar282018

      Apple Faces Multiple Lawsuits Over Slowed-Down iPhones

      According to the Wall Street Journal today:

      Some five dozen iPhone customers have filed at least 59 separate lawsuits since December accusing Apple of slowing their phones to spur people to buy new iPhones....

      Apple settled... [a previous] class-action lawsuit in 2012, agreeing to either pay iPhone 4 owners $15 or give them a free case, according to Ira Rothken, an attorney who represented the plaintiffs. The total potential settlement amount was $315 million...

      ...Plus, a decision against Apple could require it and other tech companies to be more transparent about how their software or hardware features affect power or performance, said Mr. Rothken, who isn’t involved in this legal action. For years, companies have been able to avoid such disclosures, mainly because customers haven’t demanded them. 

      “Whatever affects Apple would affect anyone making battery devices,” Mr. Rothken said.

      Read the full story in the Wall Street Journal here.

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